Thursday, November 15, 2007

Fall planting

Yesterday I finished planting 130 more daffodils on the west side of the house. That brings the bulb total to about 500. So next spring, we'll have even more of this.


Most of our bulbs are a variety of "naturalizing daffodils,"

which I bought in big mixed bags. These, I believe, are "Las Vegas."

Some are a little more exotic, like these, whose name I can't remember,

but they might be "Pink charm." I also have some "Tahiti" and a few other

exotics. There's a great big world of daffs, beyond yellow.

Though a sea of yellow in March is a lovely sight.

This is one of my favorites; I believe it's a Cassata.

These are scilla. We have about 150 of these little bulbs.

I also have a tulip bed with about 50 bulbs in it.

I've been pleasantly surprised at how many years I've

gotten out of these bulbs.

17 comments:

Lafreya said...

I want to join the ugly shoe club.I wouldn't spend money on shoes. However, I will spend money on heirloom bulbs from Old House Gardens for my heritage garden plots. My sister thinks I'm crazy for buying bulbs instead of nice shoes but I don't get the shoe thing I really don't.

Sherry said...

Gorgeous flowers...so many kinds of daffodils...there's no point in having just a few...they look so much better as a group!

iyan and egusi soup: said...

your flowers are lovely, carleen!

Carleen Brice said...

Lafreya, You are now a member! Heirloom bulbs...I'm intrigued!

Thanks Sherry and I&ES!

Sustenance Scout said...

Love these photos, Carleen! Your yard and garden must look stunning in the spring. K.

Ello said...

So beautiful! I wish I had a green thumb = unfortunately I have the plant killing thumb of death.

Carleen Brice said...

Karen and Ello, Thanks, as always, for stopping by. These pictures keep me going through these months when the yard is mostly crappy looking.

Moanna said...

Lovely flowers. Daffodils are one of my favorites.

And I just checked out the Old House Gardens Heirloom Bulb web site and found the purple Gladiolus bulbs I've been looking for.

Lafreya said...

Old House Garden is the brainchild of my one of my old professors Scott Kunst. About ten years ago just by accident, I went to one of his lectures on Heritage Garden and he displayed these 1920 varieties of Dahlias that were as big as dinner plates. They were so beautiful that as shy as I was back then I went up after the program and asked him where I could learn more about plants and history. He convinced me to get a masters degree in Historic Preservation. Changed my life and I am forever grateful to him.

Carleen Brice said...

Welcome Moanna!

Lafreya, what a great story!

Sustenance Scout said...

That IS a great story. Amazing how one thoughtful person can make such a difference, isn't it? K.

Stephanie Rose said...

I believe those last red, yellow and white tulips are the same botanical tulips, related to the original wild tulip I have called
Tulipa greigii species, which is native to Turkestan. I have a little collection of those petite, low-growing beauties and am partial to their unpretentious,quiet beauty. Some of them have literary names, like Little Red Riding Hood Tulip and I like the idea of having it in my garden because I've always been so curious about her. I took a fairytale class recently and we found her story had changed drastically over time, starting back in the late 1600s. Anyway, your garden must be so lovely! Is bulb gardening your favorite type? It's so interesting to see this post because I came to your site to look up the credits for the book you edited, "Age Ain't Nothing but a Number," because I'm building on my garden-centered prose, "Pathway Home," from that anthology in my current Sage Woman column. Synchronicity!!

Carleen Brice said...

Hi Stephanie! Yes, synchronicity! Bulb gardening isn't my favorite because you have to wait so long before you see the results. But the wait is absolutely worth it. Next year, I want to start adding more fragrant bulbs.

Sustenance Scout said...

Oooh, Carleen, I’m intrigued. Which fragrant bulbs are you considering for dry Denver? K.

Carleen Brice said...

Hi SS,
Some different types of daffodils. For spring I'm trying to stick to mostly daffs since you get so much bang for the buck out of them, ie they last almost forever.

SRB said...

Hi Carleen:

I like coming to your blog...there is a tranquil air here which is very cool. I prefer bulb gardening 'cause I'm kind of a lazy gardener, LOL. I've found you can extend your season from early spring through the fall--just takes a little research and a bit of $$$ to get started. Started mine about 17 years ago but not to replenish the late summer and fall bulbs. I think it is a profound turning point in a woman's life when she turns to the garden. So much beautiful poetry has been writen on the topic. One of my other author friends whose book will come out soon is very involved with spiritual gardening. She lives out in California. Says she's encountered devas in the garden--specific plant spirits, hers were from the string bean plant. Anyway, not to break any confidences or anything but I'll let you know when her book comes out. It is dedicated to shamanism and development of the 'self' through it. I think you'll like it. Peace!
Stephanie

Carleen Brice said...

Oh Stephanie, I'd love to know more about that book when it comes out! I'll have her on the blog too, if she's interested.