Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Mr. Magnolia

Mr. Magnolia is in today's Denver Post. He lives in Colorado Springs and runs a business selling trees from his yard. The city is threatening to cut down 13 of his trees that he planted in the median. They don't meet city specifications. I had to share this story because of this quote: "I'm the only person in this whole state that knows the secret of the magnolias." Sounds like an interesting character, doesn't he? And he must know their secrets: he's growing magnolias in Colorado. I didn't even know that was possible!

10 comments:

Lisa said...

This is a fascinating story on so many levels and I sure hope something can be worked out. I wouldn't have thought Magnolias could grow here either. I can see Mr. Magnolia as a character in a book.

Carleen Brice said...

I love people like this, and can definitely see him in a book too. Maybe he and Nona could end up together in the sequal to Orange Mint and Honey? :)

Shauna Roberts said...

I'm rooting for Mr. Magnolia to triumph over heartless, beauty-hating bureaucracy.

Sherry said...

This man is an inspiration. I was thinking the same thing as Lisa and you Carleen...he'd be a magnificent character in a book! That quote alone would be enough to fuel the plot line!

Lisa said...

Nona and Mr. Magnolia would be great, or maybe even Ivy...maybe he helps her get it together, you never know! Oh wait, I guess you're the only one who knows :)

The Writers' Group said...

Is that not the most beautiful home with the gorgeous flora and entryway? I'd say the second runner up for intriguing statements is the story of his grandmotehr palcing a magnolia blossom in her lover's handkerchief. Thanks for sharing, Carleen.

Amy MacKinnon

icanseeclearlynow said...

hi there. i think it's very cool that he knows so much about magnolias. i have NO skills in the gardening department.

:)

maria

Lafreya said...

This reminded me of the Tree Talkers in the book Sticks, Stones, Roots and Bones

Carleen Brice said...

Lafreya, You're right! I had forgotten about that.

From Sticks, Stones, Roots and Bones by Stephanie Rose Bird: "In early African American historical accounts, there are written records of people who spoke the language of the trees. They were called tree whisperers. Tree whisperers in the United States spend time living with and studying a single tree...Eventually tree whisperers can hear the tree speaking quite clearly to them."

Sustenance Scout said...

Oh my, I love that. Can't wait to read more. Thanks C.